How To Be A Good Neighbour

How To Be A Good Neighbour

Being a good neighbour can make your neighbourhood a better place to live. So pay attention to VideoJug's guide and learn how to be the perfect neighbour!

Step 1: You will need

  • neighbours
  • sense of consideration
  • smile

Step 2: Introduce yourself

When you move in to a new area, make an effort to introduce yourself to your neighbours. Being approachable from the outset will make it easier to sort out any potential disputes further down the line. Also friendly neighbours will be able to give you useful information, like what day to put your bins out.

Step 3: Consider your neighbours' lifestyle

Get to know a little about your neighbours. This will help you to be considerate of the needs of their lifestyle. If they have young children, for example, quiet evenings will be very important to them. Similarly, let your neighbours get to know you so that they are aware of your needs.

A common source of neighbourly tension is the issue of noise disturbance. Household maintenance can't be avoided, but be considerate of your neighbours when doing anything that creates excessive noise - like hammering or drilling. Try to keep noisy activities to the daytime, between 9am and 7pm.

Vibrations travel easily through shared walls. If you're in a terrace or semi detached house, position noisy household appliances like washing machines and tumble dryers - even TVs and speakers - away from party walls. If you're above someone in a block of flats, consider putting lino or rubber matting underneath your appliances to deaden the noise.

Barking is normal dog behaviour, but if it gets out of hand it can be a significant noise disturbance to your neighbour. If you have problems controlling your dog's barking or whining, consider seeking advice from your local vet or the RSPCA.

Parking disputes are another common source of neighbourly tension. When you park your vehicle, consider - are you blocking anyone else's access? When using your car early in the morning or late at night, close car doors quietly and try not to over-rev the engine.

Step 4: Parties

If you're planning a party, be sure to give your neighbours plenty of warning, letting them know when it's going to start and how long you expect it to go on. Leave them a telephone number to contact if they need to ask you to turn it down. If you get on well with your neighbours, why not invite them too? When it comes to the party itself, stick to your agreed arrangements and ask your guests to be considerate when leaving.

Step 5: Keep your garden tidy

Keep your garden in check by weeding regularly. Even if you don't mind what your garden looks like, weeds in an adjoining property can make it harder for your neighbours to keep their garden weed-free.

Step 6: Control your bonfire

If you need to have a barbecue or bonfire, try to position it where the smoke and smell will cause the least disturbance to your neighbours. Let them know you plan to have a fire and give them an idea of how long it will last - that way they can avoid putting their washing out at the same time!

Step 7: Put rubbish out on the right day

Only put your rubbish out on the day it's due for collection. Bags of rubbish that are left lying around can attract vermin which carry disease, or block other peoples' access. Leaving rubbish out unnecessarily can carry a fine so make use of your wheelie bin or communal bin area. If your wheelie bin isn't big enough then contact your local council to request another.

Step 8: Communicate

Above all, make sure you communicate well with your neighbours. Keep them informed of anything you are planning which may affect them, and be prepared to discuss any problems they might have in order to reach a compromise. Remember the golden rule of treating others as you would wish to be treated, and you won't go far wrong.

If you are experiencing problems with an anti-social neighbour and are unable to resolve them yourself, then visit the government's Respect website. This will give you in