How To Draw A Snowflake

How To Draw A Snowflake

No two snowflakes are alike, and you can create a million different designs when you start with Children's Book Illustrator Lyn Stone's basic snowflake how-to film presented by VideoJug. All you need is a pencil, paper and a ruler - and then let your imagination run away with you

I'm going to show you how to draw a snowflake. And as a beginner, I would suggest that you use a ruler, a pencil, and have your handy rubber at hand. Okay, first of all, we're going to draw a triangle, okay, and my triangle is going to be - I'm going to make it ten centimeters in width.

Draw ten centimeters and then I'll make a halfway mark, like so, so that I can make a mark here and draw up. Now, the reason that I've done that is so that I can get the sides of the triangle correct as well and it's going to be ten centimeters again, from point to point and then, the other side. Okay, I've got a basic triangle.

Now, you need to mark halfway up the triangle. It's a very odd amount; it's 8.8, so that's going to be 4.

4. I'm going to bring it down a wee bit, I think. I am going to make it just under there, about there, okay.

Right, I'm next going to make a mark two-thirds up the triangle. Now, to be honest, I'm going to do this by eye, but if you want to measure it all out perfectly, then do that. So I'm going to mark it about there.

I think that's about two-thirds. I'm going to use my pencil just to check; approximately anyway. Okay, then, turn it upside down and now, you need to draw a line across there, like that as a guide, and then we need to make that wider; it's got to be ten centimeters again, across here, like this, and you see where I'm going with this.

Well, hopefully, you can. I'm doing another triangle up the other way. So again, it's got to be ten centimeters this way, and ten centimeters this way.

So in effect, you end up with a star shape on your piece of paper, like so. Now, we need to draw even smaller triangles on each edge, and I'm going to measure down about seven mil like this and then draw a line across like so, and you have to do this on each corner. So, you measure down.

Now, I'm using my eye here to get this level, okay. Same thing again, okay. We're actually going to do an upside down triangle again, believe it or not.

So I'm going to make mine, from that point, 12 mil and from that side, 12 mil. Guess what, it's 12 mil this way, too, okay. The rest, I'm going to do by eye.

Once you've done this basic pattern, you can actually adjust it and come up with a real myriad of snowflake designs. This is just the basic one to get you started, really, because snowflakes are geometrically perfect, which is why we're having to really do it this way, okay. Next, we're going to put even smaller triangles in, and to be honest, I would do this by eye.

I would not worry about measuring; you'll go mad trying to measure everything, okay. Now, we've got lines everywhere at the moment, so we need to get rid of some of these guidelines, and I'm just going to define the outside edge a little bit more. Now, I'm not going to bother putting any shaping to the center of my snowflake, but there's nothing to stop you making some shapes in the center here, using the ruler.

You know, experiment, see what sort of designs and patterns you can create by using your ruler, okay. And that is a very basic snowflake design for you to try out. No two snowflakes are alike, and you can create a million different designs when you start with Children's Book Illustrator Lyn Stone's basic snowflake how-to film presented by VideoJug.

All you need is a pencil, paper and a ruler - and then let your imagination run away with you.