How To Inline Skate

How To Inline Skate

This Videojug film will show you how to inline skate. Learn to balance, start and stop safely as well as tricks for turning corners.

I am going to talk to you about inline skating. Basically, your skates have four wheels and they're all in the same line. A lot of different inline skates have a different number of wheels.

If you're speed skating, you'll need more wheels because you want to go faster and they're a lot longer. If you're an aggressive skater, you tend to have a small plate in the middle for doing grinding and ramp skating. You'll also find that the wheels are slightly different as well.

On aggressive inlines, they have a flatter wheel and if you are doing speed skating, they have a more pointed wheel so you have less friction with the floor when you're going go fast. Today, I'm going to show you a few little tips and tricks and how to do inline skating. Once you got your skates on, you want to know how to start off and how to stop safely.

Basically, when you first start, you want to get your legs in a T position, so one foot behind the other, one at the back, one at the front. And what you want to do is you want to slowly push off in a forward direction, leaving this foot dragging behind just off the floor. Once you get going, you're going put that foot back down to slow yourself down like this.

It's important to try and keep your balance. Here are a few techniques to try and keep that. If you are standing still, see if you can lift off on to one foot and on to the other.

This will help trying to keep your legs straight and your wheels flat as well. Having angled feet like this is not good for your ankles at all. If you are toeing in or toeing out, you will get bad ankles and your boots aren't probably done up properly.

Another technique is to crouch down and tuck into a small position. Keep your legs straight, tuck down slowly and come way down. Try to keep your body straight and upright.

If you lean too far forward, you'll fall over; too far back, you'll go backwards. When you're comfortable, come back up slowly. Practice that a few times and you'll find that your balance will improve greatly.

Once you have your balance, your boots set up right, and you feel comfortable with your starting and stopping, then you'll want to get some momentum going. Once you get on the skates, you don't want to be skating too fast and too hard, you'll end up just falling over and learning no techniques. It's best to start off nice and slowly and ease your way up to the speed later.

Same again, once you got your T stop started, it's best to push off of onto one foot instead of stopping, the next foot comes out at a slight diagonal, only a little bit because then, you want to push off again. So, then, you're cutting into the rink, pushing off left and right. So, from your T stop, you want to push off, then cut out into a diagonal movement, push in, away each side.

So, once you got your starting and stopping going and you got a nice easy flow of movement, you're going to get to a corner. Now, you're going to want to know how to get around that corner. Best thing to do is to distribute your weight over to one foot.

And basically, you can do this by crossing over and as you cross over, you'll automatically turn round corners just like this. It's best to pick a direction that prefer going. So, if you prefer going to the left or the right, you'll find that your inside leg will stay where it is and your outside leg will cross over in the direction you want to go.

Sometimes, it's better to just walk this out so you know what you're doing. If you try doing it the other way, you're just going to get all your legs all messed up. So, your outside foot will go over the top of the inside foot, you want to turn that corner in too, same again, if you want to do it the other way, same again, turn right foot over which will help you go around the corners.

And once you get confident, you can pick up the speed and turn into different corners quicker and faster. And that's how to inline skate.
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