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How To Paint A Car Bumper

How To Paint A Car Bumper

Learn how to paint or repair scratches on your car bumper using a block with the help of this VideoJug tutorial and maintain the look of your precious car.

Now, the car body repair is all done, sorting the primer, all looking nice. For rubbing this down before we spray it, we put a guide coat on there, which basically is, in this situation, it's an aerosol black, just so when you're rubbing it down, any little impurities will then show up a lot easier than by just rubbing it down and looking at it because they show up as a dark line. So, vehicle's in primer, give the aerosol a real good shake, make sure you're well-ventilated, just dust it on, nice and lightly over the primed area. And how that is there, you've got to wet that all down, any little naughty bits you can see, and you can sort them out. That's the guide coat. You're now ready to be de-masked, and then re-masked up, and then rubbed down for spraying. We've prepped up the bumper. It's all been primed, it's all been guide coated. Now, we've got to mask the area up. Sometimes, you can take the bumpers off. Normally, there's a lot of work involved in taking the bumper off, especially if you're just doing one little corner. We prefer to leave them on, in general. For most people, it's a better way of doing repairs instead of removing the parts. So we're only doing this corner, so there's no need to take it off. So we've masked the surrounding areas up. So now, I've masked that through there, continuing through there with masking tape. So, put one layer around the edges, then fill in here with paper, otherwise if you sprayed here, the spray would go all over here. On the plastic, where you've got a black bit of plastic, you can buy panel wipes to remove all the residue that's been put in there over the years. We prefer to use a little bit of thinners. It's a very strong abrasive but the only thing that seems to clear up, all the rubbish that's been there in the past, and get it nice and clean. Doing it this way, the masking tape sticks. Normally, with the panel wipe, it doesn't. The only trouble with doing things down here, make sure you've got your elbows on, you need to get right down there so you can get your nice line. Just mask it up nice and professionally. Unless you're right down with it, you're not going to get your edges done properly. Around the corners, the best way to do it is to cut off a bit of masking tape and just work your way around, a bit tricky. Make sure you keep your eyes on what you're doing, and in general, you'll be fine. The masking tape is sticking to that absolutely lovely, around that corner, and I've missed, and I'll fill it in now. We've got a dodgy edge there. Even fill the rest of it with a wider tape. If you don't mask up this inside area for priming or painting, you will get so much over-spray on there that it will take you hours to get off in comparison with spending five minutes masking it up nicely. As I said, very tricky, and I've been doing this for the last thirty years, so, good luck. You're going to need it. That's this area all masked up, all nice and completed, and that's the area prepped up, and we're going now to the wet flatted and then paint it. Bumper repairs. It's all in primer, been guide coated, and now we're going to rub it down, get ready to spray it. The same procedure as what I would do on a body work. It all works out the same. I'm using a 400 rubbing down paper to rub down the top surface of there, and I will finish off with a finer rubbing down paper, exactly the same procedure as you do with any bodywork. Always start off on the coarser ones; always go to the finer ones. The finer the finish job is, the better the job will be, because less scratches. The biggest problem you have with any sort of paint work is getting rid of all the scratches so when you put the paint on, it goes on nice and smooth. How that bumper is sitting there now, going to give it a dry flat over the top. There are no repairs anywhere, so all I want to do is just take the primer off the vehicle, off the top surface of the vehicle, to get it all nice and smooth. Leave a nice surface where we put the top coat on. We're painting this corner of the bumper, and we're blending the color through, so I want to try to keep it as small as possible. Pat the material every now and then to get the primer which is stuck on the paper. I will remove most of the guide coat, but in general, all of it doesn't need to come off as long as the shape is all looking good. Lovely! Now, I'm going to go on to wet flatting, your bucket water with p-800 and dry. Try and start off in a certain area so you know what you've done and what you haven't. Try not to stay in the same area. If you rub down a little bit there, it would make an indent. Always work it on a larger repair. Go over the area. Back it in nice straight lines. Look at my fingers, they're nice and flat. In that case, I'm using the palm of my hand. The whole area would all be cut back, all nice and straight, all on the same level. Always listen as you're rubbing down, especially bottom corners, just so a little bit of grit will go onto your paper. You normally hear it. It feels like there's some form of body there, and a bit of grit, a bit of muck, a bit of mud or whatever, or scratch, light on the car, you don't want that. That'll cause you more problems. So if that happens, dip the paper back into your bucket and carry on. I'm sitting on a bit of cloth. You can use a knee pad. It becomes a little more comfortable. It's not very good for your body to be on your knees straight onto the concrete. Get all your edges all nice. I've got a bit of 2000 here. So I'm just going to use it and flick round the surrounding areas. Wherever the 800 paper is, you need to spray on top of that. If you don't spray it, it will show up as a rubbing down mark, and if you're getting a nice finish on your car, you don't want to be seeing a rubbing down mark. A little bit of over spray which continues along the vehicle, a bit of 2000 takes that off and you haven't got to pull out the 2000. The only thing I use is a gray scotch. A red scotch is too coarse, which you can use when you want to put the car in primer in the first place. But for painting and blending out, use a gray one. Make sure you go right through the corners and the edges. If it's going to flake, that's where it's going to flake. In general, it won't flake from the center area here; it'll always be from a corner where you get a bit of paint build up or where it hasn't been rubbed down at all. Just get right around those corners and areas. Give it a good rub down. We're going to blend the lacquer down to this area here, so I'm making sure I give a good rub down on there. Put a little bit of pressure on there. You don't want to be going over it in six months' time, re-doing a flaky paint. Any flaky paint problems are such a big thing to have to redo again, so you're making sure you rub all the places down nice. Get a bit of fluff, wiping over the area that's been 800, 2000, where I'm going to be blending too. Take all the over-spray off, keeping the area as small as I possibly can, and now using a clean dry cloth to wipe over everything that's been wet flatted off. All the time I'm fully focused on what I'm doing, just checking that everything is all looking nice and pretty. What you don't want to do is you're getting ready to start spraying it and then you realize you've missed a bit. This area now is all ready to be painted. This car now has been masked up, wet flatted, the only thing now to do is the tack cloth. Sticky bit of cloth, which when you're all ready to spray, literally I would tack cloth it now, get all the impurities off, and when you're ready to spray, you've got the paint mixed up in the gun, and you're all ready to spray, tack cloth it again. Same with most things you do on the DIY side is the preparation. The better the preparation is, the better the finished job will turn out. Now, always make sure your presentation and your preparation is as best as you can get it. If something feels rough in general when you finish spraying it, or when the job's finished, it will be rough. You see the guide coat, a little bit I've missed. See the guide coat in that top area there; it's a little bit rough. I'll just go over that area again, a little lip off. Just by doing that, will just make so much difference, just tidies up that top area where before it was a little bit rough. Now, taking the guide coat off there a little bit more and it's all lovely and smooth. Get gray scotch in there. Make sure it's all nice and rubbed down right inside that crack. When tack clothing, I'd normally have a blower with it as well, or the spray gun, so any particles of dust as you're blowing, and you tack cloth it off, will be removed. Then you have a perfect finished, lovely flat, matte finish ready to be base-coated on these areas, blend the color through, black the whole surrounding areas, job done. It's the same theory on body work as it is on a bumper. The areas that we've primed are around here, you put your base coat color on. You then blend the color through this area here, in big volumes, lots of volumes of paint to lesser volumes of paint. Further the color out through this area here as you just go, and you spray lighter coat, and your lacquer to another edge further down, around this sort of area here. Always go for a smaller area. You don't want to be blending the color out there. To try and get it all shiny from old paint to new paint there is a lot harder than doing it from a little area like here. So I'd want to lacquer to here, blend the color through this little strip here, and that way all you've got to do is polish this little strip here, job done. Hope what I've explained to you today has come in useful. If there are any other problems, you can check out our website or give us a phone call and we'll be glad to help you out.