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How To Stop Fighting Chickens

How To Stop Fighting Chickens

Chickens fight not only to establish a pecking order, but because they're overcrowded or bored. In this video, a professional poultry breeder explains how to make simple inexpensive toys for your chickens that will keep them healthy, happy, and docile.

How to stop your chickens fighting. The first point to make is, if you've got two cockerels fighting, they will need separating, but as for the hens, it's normally down to boredom. You've got to remember the fact that the pecking order does have to happen, so that you have one girl that rules the roost, and the others will all take place.

That is what happens in a flock. But if you do have trouble with feather pecking, or fighting, then add some distractions to the girls. Hang things up in bird feeders - old CD's - go out into the hedgerow and get some blackberries or dock leaves, or dandelions, and hang them in bunches, just to give them entertainment and to keep them busy.

Feather pecking and fighting is normally down to boredom. Hanging perches work really well. It gives them an aerobic exercise as well.

Keeps them nice and fit so you get lots of eggs. The more space you can give your chickens, the less chance they're going to be fighting and pecking each other. They do need space.

They get bored. They're like children. The other thing you can do is collect all the autumn fall, the dry leaves, put them in a big bundle, and they'll have great fun.

Move logs into the runs and things. Entertain them. Honestly, it's just great for the chickens.

Keep them active and happy and it will eliminate a lot of your problems. The other key is a lot of people confuse fighting, unless you can physically see the girls arguing, in which case, it will be entertainment. The other thing is the molt.

They can go bald when they're having their annual molt. It doesn't mean they're fighting. Their feathers will fall out.

So, just be aware. If you have a bald chicken, a really good way to tell if it's feather pecking is to just have a look at the tips of the feathers. If there are feathers in there with a beak mark out, like a V, then it's a sure sign that your chickens are fighting and pecking each other.

So, remember, if you're having problems with your chickens fighting or feather pecking, give them some more space and entertain them with toys, things like that, a swing, really cheap and easy to do. Entertain them. It really helps.

And that's how to stop chickens fighting. This is just one of many tips derived from my book, "The Essential Guide to Choosing and Keeping Happy Healthy Hens".
Chickens fight not only to establish a pecking order, but because they're overcrowded or bored.

In this video, a professional poultry breeder explains how to make simple inexpensive toys for your chickens that will keep them healthy, happy, and docile. Raising chickens, Backyard chickens, Chickens fighting, Raising chickens, Tips on raising chickens, Keeping urban chickens, Raising hens, How to keep hens, Information on keeping chickens, Fighting chickens, pecking order, stop chickens from fighting, hens, molt, pecking chickens
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